Jenner & Block

Brian J. Fischer is a litigator in our Complex Commercial Litigation Practice Group.  His expansive practice has been built advocating for clients in a wide range of commercial and regulatory disputes in courts at all levels throughout the country, and in arbitral settings, on both the defense and plaintiff side.

Fortune 500 and other major companies, hedge funds, and individuals seek Mr. Fischer’s representation on business and financial disputes concerning contractual rights, fiduciary obligations, trade secret protection, employment agreement covenants, and regulatory matters.  Over the years, Mr. Fischer has counseled clients on disputes concerning complex financial products, transaction agreements, joint ventures, and financial frauds.  Mr. Fischer also has significant experience representing global aerospace, engineering and defense firms in conflicts with foreign sovereigns and government contractors, among others.

The Legal 500 U.S. has called out Mr. Fischer as one of the “many renowned partners” in Jenner & Block’s New York office, where “commercial litigation is one of its greatest strengths.” The same publication noted that Mr. Fischer is one of the New York office’s “key figures.”

Mr. Fischer is a co-chair of the firm’s Alumni Committee.  He previously served for a number of years as a co-chair of the firm's Pro Bono Committee and the Pro Bono Executive Committee.  Named the 2008 winner of the Albert E. Jenner, Jr. Pro Bono Award, he has a vibrant civil and criminal pro bono practice.  Mr. Fischer has successfully represented immigrants seeking political asylum, individuals affected by Superstorm Sandy, an inmate whose death sentence was vacated, and a prominent journalist advancing a FOIA claim against the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, among others.  In another pro bono matter, Mr. Fischer recently secured a reversal of a conviction for an individual found to have committed various environmental law violations on grounds of improper exclusion of evidence and prosecutorial misconduct.