Jenner & Block

The Trump Administration Issues Proposed "Waters of the United States" Rule Under CWA

Sigel

 

By Gabrielle Sigel

 

On December 11, 2018, the U.S. EPA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers jointly issued a proposed rule to define the basic jurisdictional reach of the federal Clean Water Act (“CWA”), which applies to protection of the “navigable waters” of the U.S.  The proposed rule defines the term “waters of the United States,” which establishes the scope of waters subject to the CWA (“the Proposed WOTUS Rule”).  The definition of WOTUS has been the subject of decades of litigation, including at the U.S. Supreme Court, see Rapanos v. U.S., 547 U.S. 715 (2006), itself a divided opinion.  The Trump Administration’s WOTUS rule, when issued in final, would replace the definitional rule issued in June 2015 by the Obama Administration.  80 Fed. Reg. 37054.  Obama’s 2015 rule itself was the subject of litigation; including after the Trump Administration attempted to delay application of that rule.  See, e.g., Puget Soundkeeper Alliance v. Wheeler, No. C15-1342-JCC (W.D. Wash. Nov. 26, 2018).  As of now, 28 States are not subject to the 2015 rule, but to the definition of WOTUS pursuant to rules issued in 1977 and the 1980s, as well as decisions of the Supreme Court and the agencies’ guidance and practices.

The Proposed WOTUS Rule, which the Trump Administration states is consistent with the Rapanos plurality opinion written by Justice Scalia, purports to provide “clarity, predictability, and consistency” and, by limiting the scope of the CWA’s jurisdiction, “gives states and cities more flexibility to determine how best to manage waters within their borders.”  By setting forth “six clear categories of waters” that are considered WOTUS, the Proposed WOTUS Rule seeks to ensure that the CWA applies only to those waters “that are physically and meaningfully connected to traditional navigable waters.”  The six categories are, in general:

  1. Traditional Navigable Waters (“TNW”s) – large water bodies used in interstate or foreign commerce, e.g., the Mississippi River, and including territorial seas
  2. Tributaries – rivers and streams that flow to TNWs, which flow more often than just when it rains, e.g. Rock Creek, a tributary to the Potomac River
  3. Certain ditches – an “artificial channel used to convey water,” if they are TNWs (e.g. the Erie Canal), are subject to tides, or are constructed in a tributary or in an adjacent wetlands
  4. Certain lakes and ponds – TNWs; water bodies that contribute by perennial or intermittent flow downstream to TNWs; or are flooded by another WOTUS
  5. Impoundments – impoundments of otherwise defined WOTUS
  6. Adjacent wetlands – wetlands that physically touch other WOTUS; wetlands with a surface water connection in a typical year from inundation or perennial or intermittent flow; wetlands that are near a WOTUS but not physically touching due to a physical barrier if they are flooded or otherwise reconnected over the surface of the physical barrier

See the exact language of the six categories in the Proposed WOTUS Rule here.

The Proposed WOTUS Rule also specifies waters that would not be considered WOTUS, including features that contain water only in response to rain; groundwater; most farm and roadside ditches; and stormwater control features.

The Administration states that the new rule would eliminate the “time-consuming and uncertain process of determining whether a ‘significant nexus’ exists between a water and a downstream [TNW],” which has occurred since Justice Kennedy’s Rapanos opinion using the “significant nexus” language.  The Administration also notes that the new rule, when final, would narrow the scope of WOTUS by eliminating some “ephemeral” streams and all such ditches.  In addition, certain non-navigable lakes and ponds and other wetlands would no longer be regulated under the CWA.  Perhaps the most dramatic change would be in the scope of wetlands which, if physically separated, would require a direct hydrologic surface connection to an otherwise recognized jurisdictional waters to be included within CWA jurisdiction.

Any new WOTUS rule, like its predecessors, will be subject to extensive litigation and further interpretation.  The Administrator’s focus on surface bodies is likely to be a prime basis for substantively contesting the rule.

The Proposed WOTUS Rule is subject to written public comment, during a 60-day period after the Proposed Rule is formally published in the Federal Register.  Comments can be submitted electronically at Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-ow-2018-0149.

 

 

TAGS: Climate Change, Sustainability, Water

PEOPLE: Gabrielle Sigel