Jenner & Block

The Heart of the Matter Blog

December 1, 2016

Moments in History: Jenner & Block's 100-Year Story

Juan Rivera’s Conviction Is Reversed

Freedom for Juan Rivera Hugging His MomFreedom for Juan Rivera Hugging His MomDecember marks the fifth anniversary of the Illinois Appellate Court for the Second District reversing the conviction of pro bono client Juan Rivera.  Mr. Rivera had been convicted of the 1992 rape and murder of an 11-year-old girl.  The Illinois court found insufficient evidence to support his conviction in light of the DNA evidence excluding him as the perpetrator.

Click here to learn more about the case.

CATEGORIES: Moments in History, Wrongful Conviction

PEOPLE: Terri L. Mascherin, Andrew W. Vail, Thomas P. Sullivan

October 4, 2016

Moments in History: Jenner & Block's 100-Year Story

Anniversary of Dowaliby Reversal

October marks the 25th anniversary of the Illinois Appellate Court reversing the conviction of pro bono client David Dowaliby in a high-profile case that centered on the kidnapping of Mr. Dowaliby’s 7-year-old daughter Jaclyn in 1988. The Illinois Appellate Court ruled the prosecutors failed to prove that no one else killed Jaclyn and that the evidence against him was not sufficient.

Click here to learn more about the case.

CATEGORIES: Moments in History, Wrongful Conviction

July 21, 2016 Podcast Features Discussion on the Nicole Harris Case

For Nicole Harris podcast pro bono blog itemKaren Daniel, director of Northwestern Law School’s Center on Wrongful Convictions (CWC), discusses the Nicole Harris case on a recent Undisclosed podcast.  Working with the CWC, the firm represented Ms. Harris after she was wrongfully convicted of murdering her 4-year-old son in 2005.  The long-running case spanned more than seven years and involved litigating at every level of the state and federal judicial systems. Ultimately, Ms. Harris was freed from prison and exonerated of the crime.   She received a certificate of innocence from the court and was reunited with her surviving son.  In 2014, the firm and the CWC received the Seventh Circuit Bar Association’s 2014 Pro Bono and Public Service Award for their work on the case.  In the podcast, Ms. Daniel examines Ms. Harris’ false confession, given after she was subjected to police interrogation for more than 25 hours and held by herself in a cell.  “To this day, Nicole can’t explain why she confessed.  What we’ve learned is that everybody has a breaking point,” Ms. Daniel says.  To listen to the podcast, click here.  The discussion of Ms. Harris’ case starts at minute18:25.

CATEGORIES: Center on Wrongful Convictions, N Harris, Wrongful Conviction

July 13, 2016 Pro Bono Client Deserves a New Trial, Prosecutors Say

Partner Terri L. Mascherin is quoted in a Chicago Tribune article about pro bono client Adam Gray, who in 1996 was sentenced to mandatory life without parole for setting a fire that killed two people.  Now, prosecutors say that Mr. Gray deserves a new trial because dramatic advancements in fire science have “partially invalidated” expert testimony that was crucial to Mr. Gray’s arson and double murder conviction.  “We believe, based on what today’s science makes clear, that there is no evidence this fire was an arson.  We believe if this case is retried, the jury will find Adam Gray not guilty,” Ms. Mascherin says.  Other members of the team include Partner Daniel T. Fenske and Associate Brij B. Patnaik

CATEGORIES: A Gray, Wrongful Conviction

PEOPLE: Terri L. Mascherin, Daniel T. Fenske, Brij B. Patnaik

December 9, 2011

Moments in History: Jenner & Block's 100-Year Story

Watch Partner Terri Mascherin Discuss the Release of Firm's Pro Bono Client After Serving 19 Years


A team working with attorneys from Northwestern University Law School’s Bluhm Legal Clinic Center on Wrongful Convictions and Stanford Law School Professor Lawrence Marshall represented Juan Rivera in appealing his third conviction of the 1992 rape and murder of an 11-year-old girl, Holly Staker.  Read more...

CATEGORIES: Moments in History, Wrongful Conviction

PEOPLE: Terri L. Mascherin