Jenner & Block

Los Angeles Partners Named “Top 100 Lawyers in California”

The Daily Journal named Jenner & Block Partners Rick Richmond and Brandon D. Fox to its 2017 “Top 100 Lawyers in California” list.

The profile for Mr. Richmond, managing partner for the Los Angeles office and co-chair of the firm’s Trade Secrets and Restrictive Covenants Practice, highlights his leadership of the Jenner & Block trial team that won a “whopping $940 million” trade secret verdict for client Epic Systems Corp. The verdict is believed to be one of the largest in a trade secret case ever. The profile also features his role, days after the Epic verdict, in helping to lead the damages team in another trade secret case for Move, Inc. that resulted in a $130 million settlement for the plaintiff client.

In his third consecutive year on the list, Mr. Richmond is also recognized for founding the firm’s Los Angeles office with one other lawyer and growing it to more than 55, as well as for his pro bono practice that includes defending a man accused of murder in an “unusual” case. “Lawyers, in my view, continue to play a very important role in our society to ensure that justice is done and people are treated fairly and have access to the courts in a way that allows them to protect their rights,” he says. 

Mr. Fox’s profile notes that he joined Jenner & Block to strengthen the firm’s Investigations, Compliance and Defense Practice on the West Coast in May, following his successful career as a federal prosecutor and as the head of the public corruption and civil rights section at the US Attorney’s Office. An experienced trial lawyer and the only lawyer on the list selected for an investigations practice, Mr. Fox’s profile highlights his courtroom success in complex cases. As an example, the article features his prosecution of Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca, characterized as the end of “a long-running drama” that resulted in Baca and twenty other law enforcement officials being convicted in high-stakes trials.  Mr. Fox says that his prosecutions against Sheriff’s Department leaders in US District Court “let the public see how and why civil rights abuses have been going on.”

The profile also points to one incident in which opposing counsel attempted to disqualify Mr. Fox from the case by claiming he was a necessary witness to a conversation in which the former sheriff was accused of making false statements, despite several other witnesses being present for the conversation. The motion was denied after the judge compared it to an attempt to remove an all-pro quarterback from a football game. “I took it as probably the highest compliment you can get as a trial lawyer,” Mr. Fox says.