Jenner & Block

Jenner & Block is proud of its 2019 pro bono results:

 

 

February 6, 2020 Representing Big Shoulders Fund in Landmark Agreement with the Archdiocese of Chicago

The firm represented long-time pro bono client Big Shoulders Fund in the negotiation of a historic agreement with the Archdiocese of Chicago to support Catholic schools in the neediest areas of Chicago.

Completed in December 2019 and announced in early 2020, the agreement provides for tens of millions of dollars to be invested in Catholic schools in Chicago’s lower-income communities over the next decade.  An article in The Chicago Tribune described the effort as “a massive investment that comes amid widespread challenges to keeping schools open.”  The agreement was also announced in Crain’s Chicago Business.

Under the agreement, the Archdiocese and Big Shoulders together will provide more than $90 million in 30 Catholic schools located predominantly on the city’s South and West sides, with Big Shoulders donating $47.5 million to schools from Auburn Gresham to the Austin neighborhood over the next 10 years, and the Archdiocese providing nearly $45 million, to keep the schools open and improve their scholastic performance.

The Jenner & Block team, led by Partner Vincent E. Lazarand Big Shoulders Fund board member Daniel R. Murray, along with former associate David D. Heckman, worked with the client for more than a year to fashion this groundbreaking agreement.

TAGS: Transactional

PEOPLE: Daniel R. Murray, Vincent E. Lazar

February 5, 2020 Firm Wins Illinois Appellate Victory for Pro Bono Client in Car Insurance Dispute

A team represented Robert Nixon, a 72-year-old veteran.  At issue in the long-running case was Mr. Nixon’s auto insurance policy, which the insurance company refused to honor after he was involved in an accident.

In 2014, Mr. Nixon purchased a used car and acquired an auto insurance policy from Direct Auto Insurance Company.   When Mr. Nixon was in an accident a few months later, Direct Auto refused to cover him and rescinded his policy, claiming that Mr. Nixon had lied on his insurance application because he had not listed his cousins as members of his “household.”   Because Direct Auto refused to defend Mr. Nixon’s insurance claim, a lawsuit by the other driver in the accident resulted in a default judgment against Mr. Nixon, as well as suspension of his driver’s license for driving without insurance.

Direct Auto sued Mr. Nixon in the Circuit Court of Cook County, seeking a declaratory judgment that it was not obligated to indemnify him in light of its rescission.   Mr. Nixon retained the pro bono assistance of another law firm, who took to the case to trial in the Circuit Court of Cook County.   After a bench trial, the Circuit Court ruled for Mr. Nixon, holding that Direct Auto was obligated to indemnify him for the accident.   The circuit court also held that Mr. Nixon had not lied on his application and that Direct Auto had deliberately made its application confusing and misleading. The circuit court held that Direct Auto’s rescission of the policy was “vexatious and unreasonable” and imposed the maximum allowable sanction under the Illinois Insurance Code, awarding an additional $60,000 to Mr. Nixon. 

Direct Auto appealed, and the firm stepped in to represent Mr. Nixon.  On September 30, 2019,  the Illinois Appellate Court affirmed the judgment for Mr. Nixon.  The appellate court agreed with the firm that even if Mr. Nixon’s cousins were members of his household (which they were not), that purported misrepresentation would have been immaterial and would not have justified rescission of the policy.  The time for Direct Auto to appeal to the Illinois Supreme Court elapsed on January 8, 2020.

Associate Leigh J. Jahnig drafted the response brief, with assistance from Associate Nathaniel K.S. Wackman.   Partners John Mathias, Jr., and David M. Kroeger supervised the drafting.  Paralegal Mary Patston provided invaluable assistance.

TAGS: Appellate, Litigation

PEOPLE: David M. Kroeger, John H. Mathias, Jr., Nathaniel K. S. Wackman, Leigh J. Jahnig

January 9, 2020 Firm Secures Below-Guidelines Sentence for Client

Through the firm’s work serving on the Criminal Justice Act panel in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, a team of associates secured a favorable and unexpected outcome in a pro bono matter. 

The case involved a 23-year-old client who had a significant prior criminal record and who was subsequently charged with selling relatively large quantities of drugs on 12 occasions to an undercover officer. 

Associate Tali Leinwand led the case, with assistance from Associate Logan J. Gowdey and supervision from Partners Anthony S. Barkow and Katya Jestin

The team negotiated a plea agreement with the government shortly after the client's arrest that reduced the mandatory minimum sentence from 120 months to 60 months.  Despite the government's recommendation for an incarceration term of at least 100 months, and a Sentencing Guidelines range of up to 150 months' incarceration, the client was ultimately sentenced to a below-Guidelines term of 72 months in prison. 

During the sentencing proceeding in December 2019, Chief Judge Colleen McMahon praised Ms. Leinwand's "very eloquent" oral argument and her and Mr. Gowdey's "excellent brief," telling the client how fortunate he was to have received such "excellent lawyering" and specifically citing favorable policy arguments that were set forth in the brief.  The client was very appreciative as well. 

Over the course of the representation, the team was also assisted by Associate Matt Phillips, summer associate Idun Klakegg, and paralegals Ricia Augusty and Charlotte Stretch.
 

TAGS: criminal defense, Litigation

PEOPLE: Katya Jestin, Anthony S. Barkow, Matthew J. Phillips, Tali R. Leinwand, Logan J. Gowdey

December 19, 2019 Fourth Circuit Revives Maryland-Based Census Suit

The firm secured a pro bono victory on behalf of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Prince George’s County, Maryland, and other plaintiffs that are challenging the federal government’s plans for the 2020 Census.  Co-counsel with the Rule of Law Clinic at Yale Law School, the firm argues that the Bureau’s deficient plans will lead to an undercount of communities of color, leading to inequities in political representation and federal funding.

Originally filed in 2018, NAACP et al. v. Bureau of the Census was dismissed in 2019 at the district court level.  On December 19, 2019, the Fourth Circuit reinstated the suit, remanding it back to the district court to reconsider the plaintiffs’ Enumeration Clause claims.  The unanimous three-judge panel concluded that the district court “erred in dismissing the plaintiffs’ Enumeration Clause claims as unripe, and in precluding the plaintiffs from filing an amended complaint regarding those claims after the defendants’ plans for the 2020 Census became final.”

Partner Jessica Ring Amunson argued the appeal with a student from the Yale Law Clinic.  The team also includes Partners Susan Kohlmann, Jeremy Creelan and Michael Ross; Special Counsel Seth Agata; Associates Jacob Alderdice, Amy Egerton-Wiley, Logan Gowdey, Alex Trepp, Matthew Phillips, Keturah James and David Clark; Law Clerk Andrew Whinery; and Paralegal Esmeralda Bako.

“This decision gets us closer to a more just 2020 Census and shines a light on the critical issues at stake in the decennial census,” Ms. Amunson said in a press release about the decision.

At the NAACP’s annual meeting in July 2019, the organization honored the team with its “Foot Soldier in the Sand Award” for its efforts in the case.

The NAACP suit is the second suit the firm has filed, pro bono, seeking to ensure that the census adequately counts hard-to-count populations.  The firm also represents the Center for Popular Democracy Action and the city of Newburgh, New York, in a suit that seeks an injunction that would require the government to implement a plan to ensure that hard-to-count populations will be enumerated.  Filed in November 2019, Center for Popular Democracy Action and City of Newburgh v. Bureau of the Census is pending.

TAGS: Appellate, Census, Litigation

PEOPLE: Jessica Ring Amunson, Susan J. Kohlmann, Michael W. Ross, Jeremy M. Creelan, Alex S. Trepp, Matthew J. Phillips, Jacob D. Alderdice, Amy Egerton-Wiley, Seth H. Agata, Logan J. Gowdey, David J. Clark

December 17, 2019 Firm Wins $11 Million Jury Verdict for Imprisoned Pro Bono Client after Failed Cancer Diagnosis

On December 17, a unanimous jury in Springfield, IL returned a more than $11 million verdict for incarcerated pro bono client William Kent Dean.  The jury found that Wexford Health Sources, Inc. and several of its employees violated Mr. Dean’s federal civil rights (8th Amendment, deliberate indifference) and committed both institutional negligence and medical malpractice under Illinois law.  With a team led by Jenner & Block Chair Craig C. Martin, the result concluded a seven-day trial before US District Judge Sue Myerscough in the Central District of Illinois.

Mr. Dean has stage-4 metastatic kidney cancer, which is terminal.  While imprisoned in the Taylorville Correctional Center in central Illinois, he began showing obvious signs of serious illness, including gross hematuria, or visible blood in his urine, in late 2015.   Despite his alarming symptoms, Mr. Dean did not receive proper diagnostic testing for four months and did not receive surgery for seven months.  Jenner & Block was appointed as his pro bono counsel in 2017.

“We are very pleased that the jury saw fit to compensate our client and his family for the tragic events surrounding his care.  The delays in providing that care essentially have become a death sentence for Mr. Dean,” said Mr. Martin.  “As his pro bono counsel, every member of our team has been privileged to tell his story, give a voice to his suffering and make the defendants accountable for this very serious error in care.”

At issue in the case was Wexford’s policy of “collegial review,” a process intended to address clinically appropriate and cost-conscious care that Wexford used instead to avoid paying for necessary care.  From December 2015 to July 2016, while Mr. Dean was held at Taylorville Correctional Center, the delays occasioned by collegial review allowed Mr. Dean’s cancer to grow and metastasize. In closing, Mr. Martin asked the jury to consider not only the pain, suffering and mental anguish Mr. Dean had endured, but also the opportunity to send a message to Wexford that collegial review cannot be used to delay care.

The jury’s award included an assessment of $10 million in punitive damages against Wexford itself.

In addition to Mr. Martin, Jenner & Block trial team members included Partner Joel Pelz and Associates William M. Strom, Chloe Holt and Nathaniel K.S. Wackman.  The team was assisted by paralegals Dan Rooney, Kevin Garcia and Eric Herling.  In addition to their service, several trial members also provided their services pro bono, including trial director Dylan Green of Green Legal Technology and the trial graphics professionals, Kent and Val Bell of Discoll Bell LLC.

On January 28, 2020, Mr. Dean was released from Illinois Department of Corrections custody upon completing his prison sentence. He was picked up from Taylorville Correctional Center by his wife, Cynthia Dean, and called his lawyers at Jenner & Block during their drive home to La Salle County, Illinois. Mr. Dean had been in custody since 2010. He will now begin a three-year term of court supervision to complete his sentence.

In February 2020, the Chicago Lawyer magazine highlighted the case in a feature article.

The case name is Dean v. Wexford Health Sources, et al.


 

TAGS: Litigation, Section 1983

PEOPLE: Joel T. Pelz, William M. Strom, Nathaniel K. S. Wackman

November 20, 2019 Lawsuit Seeks to Ensure that 2020 Census Counts Hard-To-Count Populations

Jenner & Block has filed a lawsuit seeking to ensure that the US government alter its “deficient” plans for the 2020 census so that hard-to-count populations are counted. 

Co-counsel with the Rule of Law Clinic at Yale Law School, the firm represents the Center for Popular Democracy Action, a New York-based non-profit that works to “expand the voice and power of workers, communities of color and immigrants on issues of economic and racial justice,” and the city of Newburgh, located in the Southern District of New York.  Newburgh is home to large Hispanic American, African American and undocumented populations, making it a hard-to-count community for the 2020 Census.

The complaint describes the risk of a constitutionally and statutorily deficient census, which is used to allocate public funding, for seat apportionment in the US House of Representatives and to create state legislative districts.  Specifically, according to the complaint, the government’s Final Operational Plan “drastically and arbitrarily reduces the necessary resources for key activities,” the complaint reads.  It asks that the court hold unlawful five Census Bureau actions, including plans to hire an unreasonably small number of enumerators and a drastic reduction in the number of field offices.

“These decisions are not supported by reason.  They will inevitably cause a massive and differential undercount of communities of color,” the complaint reads.

Among other things, the lawsuit seeks an injunction that would require the government to implement a plan to ensure that hard-to-count populations will be enumerated in the census.

The team that filed the complaint included Partners Jeremy M. Creelan and Susan J. Kohlmann, Special Counsel Seth H. Agata , Associates Jacob D. Alderdice and David J. Clark and Law Clerk Keturah James.


 

TAGS: Census, Litigation

PEOPLE: Susan J. Kohlmann, Jeremy M. Creelan, Jacob D. Alderdice, Seth H. Agata, David J. Clark

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